Start Dating scans during pregnancy

Dating scans during pregnancy

You might be offered more than two scans – for example, if there are concerns about your health or your baby’s growth.

The sonographer will take a detailed look at your baby’s heart, brain, bones, spinal cord, face, kidneys and abdomen to check for a range of conditions.

Not all problems can be detected by the anomaly scan, but if the sonographer sees any cause for concern, you’ll be told there and then.

It will check whether you’re expecting one baby or more and that your baby is developing as it should be at this stage.

You should also be offered an antenatal screening test for Down’s syndrome and other chromosomal abnormalities at this stage.

This is called the combined test, because it involves a blood test as well as the scan, and can be carried out between 10 and 14 weeks.

It’s also sometimes referred to as the NT (nuchal translucency) scan.

Of these, 36% arrange extra scans for reassurance that all’s well.

The advice from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is to have your early scan and then the anomaly scan at 18-20 weeks.

From your early pregnancy scan to your anomaly scan and beyond, ultrasound scans check that your baby is developing as it should be.

When you go for a pregnancy scan, the sonographer (a specialist trained in ultrasound scans) puts ultrasound gel on your tummy and then moves a handheld probe across your skin.

You might be offered further tests to give you more information about the problem, but you won’t have to make an instant decision about whether to have them.